giovedì 8 gennaio 2009

Medieval Swords

Medieval Swords
We are your one stop shop for Medieval Swords, Renaissance Clothing and many other Medieval & Renaissance items. We have been serving the online community since 1999. We carry high quality battle-ready and decorative swords, armour, shields, and other weaponry of the past and present. Our site is updated daily to bring you the most current information on things like pre-orders and new products. We also upload products weekly so there is always something new and exciting. Use our Advanced Search option to see what we have added recently. We are the largest online distributor of Medieval and Renaissance items. Here is a list of things that we offer: Medieval Swords, Renaissance Clothing, Celtic Jewelry, Medieval Jewelry, Medieval Pipes, Lord of the Rings Swords, Renaissance Boots, Authentic Long Bows, Traditional Archery Supplies, Historical Arrow Heads, Functional Armor, Decorative Armor, Chainmail, Leather Armour, Medieval Daggers, Scottish Dirks, Fantasy Daggers, Medieval Helmets, Roman, Scottish, Greek, Celtic, Irish, Peasants, Pirates, Knights, Renaissance Rapiers, Medieval Shields, Scottish Shields, Halberds, Battle Axes, Maces, Flails, Castle Décor, Medieval Banners, Medieval Tapestries, Queens Crowns and Kings Crowns, Renaissance Hats, Leather Masks, Sword Canes and believe it or not, much, much more! So take your shoes off, relax for a little while and have a look around.

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venerdì 24 ottobre 2008

Medioevo Shop

Medioevo shop

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giovedì 23 ottobre 2008

Medieval Tapestry

Medieval Tapestry

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martedì 23 settembre 2008

Medieval geography

Medieval geography
The great kingdoms of Sanfotsi and Toupo (Shopo) mentioned in the Chinese geographical works of Chau Ju-Kua, Chou Ku-Fei and Ma Tuan-lin are often located inareas of the West like Sumatra, Java and Malaysia. However, a close analysis of the texts give directions that point decidely further East. Thus, scholars like Roland Braddell and Paul Wheatley have looked further East, specifically to the region of Northern Borneo. Some other researchers, though, like J.L. Moens, from the Leiden school, M. Yang-ouen-hoei, D'Harvey de St. Denis and Austin Craig asserted that either Sanfotsi or Toupo were located among the Philippine islands.

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domenica 21 settembre 2008

Medieval Feasts

Medieval Feasts
Medieval feasts and dinners were remarkably similar to our own modern manner of eating; today's meals generally start out light, such as with a soup or salad, then move on to the heavier items of meats and vegetables, and end with something sweet - and the more formal or special the occasion, the more likely the dessert will be something extravagant or showy. Medieval meals, too, followed such a pattern, but the reasons for the foods that were eaten, how they were prepared, and when they were eaten followed a train of thought much different than ours of today.
Dinners & feasts usually started with foods that were considered easily digestible, such as light meats, warm & moist foods such as soups and broths, moist fruits (especially peaches), and greens such as lettuce, cabbage, and "herbs." Spices were thought to warm the stomach, and were therefore an excellent stomach opener. Cheese was eaten both before and during the meal, as an aid to digestion and to help a "weak stomach." Foods that were more difficult to digest, such as beef & fatty pork and heavy fruits, like pears & chestnuts, were consumed later in the meal. In large feasts, very rich and exotic foods were served in smaller portions only to highly distinguished guests after the more filling and common dishes had been served to the entire hall. This practice would continue as the feast progressed, ending with the finest of delicacies being served to just the table of the king or nobleman in charge of the affair.
www.stoneclave.com/tavern/food/med_feast.asp

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giovedì 11 settembre 2008

Medieval Community

Medieval community
www.shadowedrealm.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=532

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martedì 2 settembre 2008

Medieval Fossils

Medieval Manuscripts fossils
Through the ages, innumerable texts have been consumed by fire, war, theft, and other disasters. Each ancient or medieval manuscript in existence today has its own story of survival against the odds, whether the document was tucked away in an obscure monastery for a millennium or stolen by Vikings and passed from collector to collector. Manuscript experts have long puzzled over the question, what fraction of ancient works has survived?
findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1200/is_15_167/ai_n13667902

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lunedì 18 agosto 2008

Medieval Bible

Medieval bible
The Latin Bible of the Middle Ages lacked a standard canonical version and differed considerably from modern Bible edition. It could consist of one or many volumes and varied considerably in size. The Latin translation could correspond to those we find in contemporary versions or be traced to older sources. Even the order of the biblical books could vary. The Latin Bible of the Middle Ages also contained texts which later came to be regarded as non-canonical. Only during the 16th century, did the Bible develop the form we are familiar with today.

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domenica 3 agosto 2008

Medieval Armenian Manuscripts

Medieval Armenian Manuscripts

www.library.ucla.edu/biomed/his/immi/armenian/armenianms1p250s.htm

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mercoledì 23 luglio 2008

Medieval Market


Medieval Market
www.themedievalmarket.com/

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domenica 13 luglio 2008

Medieval Diet

Medieval Diet

Dairy products art packed with bone-building calcium, rich vitamins & nutrients. Unfortunately, they art also packed with cholesterol, fat & high calories.

Conquering the high calories & fat that art packed in thy dairy products wilt be one of the biggest challenges thy wilt face whilst dieting.

Milk, cream cheese, cheese, cottage cheese, sour cream, buttermilk, yogurt, butter, ice cream – all packed with both naughty & good things for thy body. Therefore, Maiden Sky ‘tis offering some solutions by separating the naughty from the good in an effort to bring thee more wholesome, healthier dairy goodies to thy feasting tables.

www.medievaldiet.com/YeGate12.html

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mercoledì 25 giugno 2008

Medieval Bookstore

Medieval bookstore
Castle Furnishings has an exceptional selection of books relating to medieval and renaissance topics. Although we primarily cater to medieval re-creators, those of a more academic inclination will also find much here to interest them. Although we carry many books on "practical" subjects, such as cooking, costuming, archery, calligraphy and metalworking, we also carry primary source material (usually translated into English), a great many art books and scholarly books from academic presses (many of these are remainders at quite reasonable prices).

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sabato 21 giugno 2008

Medievalismo

Medievalismo
Medievalismo - Site of Medieval History, tries to be a point of contact, meeting and reflection on Medieval History.

In the network from 1998 (1 of May), now, we initiated a new way, more dynamic and modern. With ambition and the necessity to adapt us to the changes of articles of incorporation, historical and technological of century XXI.
We want to be a reference of utility, communication and interactivity, between the professionals and interested of the Medievo and the New Technologies. For it, in this space, you will find all the information necessary to be able to complete your works and restlessness.
Let us do of History a referring one for the society.

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venerdì 20 giugno 2008

Middle Age on line

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lunedì 16 giugno 2008

Medieval Geography

Medieval Geography
European history requires some knowledge of European geography and so there will be map-based questions in your exams. For this assignment atlases are available in Library Reference Room of the Library. Other geographical information can be gathered from the Encyclopaedia Britannica or Encyclopedia Americana which open each article on a country with an account of its geography
www.fordham.edu/halsall/maps/mapquiz.htm

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mercoledì 11 giugno 2008

Medieval Literature

Medieval Literature in France
Its over 130 links, leading to scores of different stories, include short narrative forms (fabliaux, fables, lays, contes, courtly tales, etc.). Some are satirical works with component episodic "branches", some are prose, while one, labeled "chante-fable", is intermittent prose and verse. Some lend themselves well to musical theater performance. Major categories are determined by numbers of links.

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sabato 7 giugno 2008

Medieval Sun

Medieval Sun
Back to architecture today. Here we look at the celing of the baptistry in Parma, Emilia-Romagna, Italy. This baptistry is not so often visited by tourists compared with the ones in Florence or Pisa, while it is considered one of the most homogenous medieval monuments in northern Italy. It is a transition work between the Romanesque and Gothic styles and is the vision of one man, Benedetto Antelami. It was built between 1196 and 1270 on an octagonal plan and constructed of pink Verona marble. The baptistry contains an impressive selection of 13th and 14th century frescoes and paintings. The inside is divided into 16 sides rising into 16 niches, with each fresco portraying a biblical scene and surrounded by sculptures representing the months, the seasons and the signs of the zodiac
http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Europe/Italy/photo399223.htm

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venerdì 6 giugno 2008

Medieval Aristotele


Medieval Aristotele
"The centuries between Aristotle and Porphyry bequeathed few logical works to the early Middle Ages. Cicero wrote a Topics, professedly based on Aristotle's work on the subject, but probably derived from a later source. The book was quite widely read in the Middle Ages, at the time when Aristotle's Topics was unknown. A work attributed to Apuleius, and bearing the same Greek title (transliterated) as the De InterpretationePeri hermeneias – enjoyed a certain vogue among the earliest medieval logicians. For modern scholars, it is a useful source of Stoic logical theories; but its philosophical content is slight.

By the time of Porphyry, however, a development had taken place in the status, rather than the doctrine, of Aristotelian logic, which would be of great importance for medieval philosophy. Aristotelian logic had been adopted by the Neoplatonists and given a definite place in their programme of teaching. Whereas their use of Aristotle's philosophical works was piecemeal and distorting, his logic was studied faithfully as a whole. Aristotle had rejected the notion of Platonic Ideas; and he had consequently treated genera and species in his logic purely as class-designations for individual things. The Neoplatonists assimilated this approach, which contradicted the very basis of their metaphysics, by limiting the application of Aristotelian logic to the world of concrete things. Stripped of its metaphysical relevance, the tendency was for logic to become more purely formal than it had been for Aristotle. However, the extra-logical aspects of the Categories and the De interpretatione were too intrinsic to these works to be ignored; and the result was the growth of a body of philosophical discussion and commentary within the Neoplatonic logical tradition, only vaguely related to Neoplatonic metaphysics, and sometimes seemingly antithetical to its principles.

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giovedì 5 giugno 2008

Medieval Brain

Medieval Brain
Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) made far-reaching contributions in many areas of science, technology and art. Leonardo's pioneering research into the brain led him to make discoveries in neuroanatomy (such as the maxillary antrum) and neurophysiology (he was the first to pith a frog). His injection of hot wax into the brain of an ox provided a cast of the ventricles and represents the first known use of a solidifying medium to define the shape and size of an internal body structure. Leonardo developed an original, mechanistic model of sensory physiology. He undertook his research with the broad goal of providing physical explanations of how the brain processes visual and other sensory input, and integrates that information via the soul.
www.davinciandthebrain.org/brain.jsp

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martedì 3 giugno 2008

Medieval Night

Medieval Night
The first thing to be said is that The Thousand and One Nights is a rather exceptional work in the context of medieval Arabic literature. It happens sometimes that a person takes up the study of a language because of his love for a single work, but if someone were tempted to begin the task of learning Arabic because of his love of The Thousand and One Nights, he should be forewarned that the book is sui generis. He will really find nothing else like it in the literature, one reason being that the Nights seems to have absorbed a number of once independent medieval Arabic fictions; the story of “Sindbad” is probably the most famous example. The borders of this text were not, it seems, ever very well defined. Hence the size of the Nights. Unfortunately, in the case of the Nights its marginality in this respect has also worked to veil its history in a good deal of obscurity. Indeed, in recounting its history in the medieval period, there is no need to summarize; a fairly complete account will read like a summary, since most of its medieval history is unknown and is likely to remain unknown. To retell the story, let us think of it for the moment as a piece of architecture—a palace, as Borges calls it. “To erect the palace of The Thousand and One Nights, it took generations of men, and those men are our benefactors, as we have inherited this inexhaustible book, this book capable of so much metamorphosis,” Borges said of one of his favorite book
www.arabiannights.org/medieval.htm

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giovedì 29 maggio 2008

Medieval Films

Medieval Films
The Medieval World in Film is a survey of various film portrayals of medieval culture. Modern notions of the medieval world are largely a creation of the scholars whose works have formed our concept of medieval culture and the many film directors who have played an equally important role in creating the modern notion of the Middle Ages. We will approach the historiography of the Middle Ages through Norman Cantor's The Creation of the Middle Ages, and attempt to compare and contrast the interpretations of the various films we will study to those of the most well-known medievalists.Our course will focus on four broad themes: The medieval discussion of the relationship between faith and reason, the ideal of the knight, portrayals of medieval monarchs, and the medieval martyr in film. Through our study of primary source texts and several films, we shall explore the many interpretations of medieval culture and the ways in which medieval ideas, figures and events have been used as commentaries on modern issues. Users may click on the links to the right for materials related to the course units or for general resources.

www.faculty.de.gcsu.edu/~dvess/ids/medieval/film/film.shtml

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lunedì 19 maggio 2008

Medieval Realism

Medieval Realism
Take yourself back in time with quality medieval clothing.
Good morrow my Lord and my Lady. "An thou wouldst play the part, Thou must dress the part!" Still don't know what to wear to the upcoming Ren Faire? Realm Collections offers the most beauteous and marvelous collection of medieval clothing and Celtic jewelry. Thou doth be most marvelous comely.

Act out a medieval scene with a knight sword, armor or shield.
You brewed the mead, prepared pygge y-farsyd, made your famous frytour blaunched; the only thing that is missing for the medieval reenactment is garb and accessories. Selection of SCA armor, medieval weaponry, functional medieval swords and shields - all under one roof. Now you're ready to recreate the civilian life of middle ages.
http://www.realmcollections.com/

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sabato 10 maggio 2008

Medieval Studies

Middle East & Islamic Studies Collection

www.library.cornell.edu

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venerdì 9 maggio 2008

Medieval Songs

Medieval Songs

http://www.medieval.net/songs.htm

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venerdì 2 maggio 2008

Medieval Sources

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giovedì 1 maggio 2008

Medieval Feasts

Medieval Feasts
Following the traditional standards of the middle ages, we will begin the feast with soup that satisfied 14th century families. Wholesome and good, heated in our spectacular fireplace and served piping hot right out of the kettle. Bread will be served to soak up the broth. www.gasthausonthelake.com/Gasthaus-MedievalFeast.html

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giovedì 24 aprile 2008

Medieval fight

Medieval fight

http://fightmedieval.com/

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venerdì 18 aprile 2008

St. George


The Martyrdom of St. George in the South English Legendary (c. 1270-80)
Edited by E. Gordon Whatley, with Anne B. Thompson and Robert K. Upchurch
Originally Published in Saints' Lives in Middle English Collections
Kalamazoo, Michigan: Medieval Institute Publications, 2004
http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/whgeointro.htm

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lunedì 14 aprile 2008

Medieval Jerusalem

Medieval Jerusalem

The year was 1095 CE, William the Conqueror had united England under one crown 30 years earlier.* The French had been dividing properties amongst their sons for generations, causing bloodshed between brothers over small pieces of real estate. In reaction, Pope Urban II expanded "The Truce of God", which outlawed fighting from Sunday to Wednesday, and banned fighting involving priests, monks, women, laborers and merchants on any day of the week. Italy was a collection of city-states, constantly being overrun by invading hordes, the latest of which were the Normans, who had just started to become "civilized".
There was also the Byzantine empire, ruling from Constantinople, who
se emperor at this time was Alexius Comnenus. To his East, the Turks were rapidly encroaching on his empire, and had begun attacking pilgrims on their way to - and in - Jerusalem, causing him great distress. He wrote to his friend Robert, the Count of Flanders, in 1093, telling him about supposed atrocities committed by the Turks on the Christian pilgrims, and Robert passed this letter on to Pope Urban II. Urban, an opportunist, saw this as a perfect way to solve some of his local problems. He personally promoted a Holy Crusade to reclaim the Holy Lands from the barbarian Turks. Thus, the First Crusade was launched in 1096 CE
.
http://www.medievalcrusades.com/

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martedì 8 aprile 2008

Medieval writings

Medieval Writings
Welcome to new users of this site, and welcome back to those returning for another look. This constantly growing project revolves around the culture of the written word in the middle ages. There is information on what people wrote about, as well as what they didn't write about but evidently knew anyway, some discussions on the working methods and materials of writing and concepts of literacy, and a steadily growing set of examples of historic scripts from around the 5th to around the 16th century. That is a broad chronology for medieval, but is there to demonstrate certain continuities in the culture and practice of writing. There are interactive paleography exercises derived from writing samples either in my possession or that of others or in archival institutions. Some examples have been published in very ancient paleography books that represent the finest of scholarship but which unfortunately nobody seems to read any more. The others have been nutted out by the partnership we call Tillotson's Medieval Enterprises, which means the interpretations may not be so authoritative, but you may not find them anywhere else. The project continues to grow, so bookmark the site so that you can return at leisure to explore around it.
http://medievalwriting.50megs.com/writing.htm

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lunedì 7 aprile 2008

St. Francis bibliography


St. Francis bibliography

http://moses.creighton.edu/harmless/bibliographies_for_theology/Medieval_5.htm

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mercoledì 2 aprile 2008

Strange Bayeux

Strange Bayeux

http://medievalwonka.ytmnd.com/
http://medievaljumparound.ytmnd.com/
http://yeoldebookstorecrash.ytmnd.com/

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sabato 29 marzo 2008

Medieval Cyberspaces

Medieval Cyberspaces

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lunedì 24 marzo 2008

Medieval Village

Welcome to the web site of The Crossroads Project, an initiative to build an ecologically sustainable community, with excellent facilities for medieval activities.
Our goal is to build a medieval village on our property at Yass, New South Wales, Australia. We wish to foster traditional crafts and skills, establish partnerships with a variety of national organisations for pre-industrial crafts, for instance in blacksmithing and embroidery.
Crossroads will provide craft workshops and camping facilities for community groups, artisans and the public.
http://www.crossroads.org.au/

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sabato 22 marzo 2008

Medieval Christ


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domenica 16 marzo 2008

Medieval clothing

Medieval clothing
The few roads that still existed were in a bad state, bridges were scarce, and brigands were common. For this reason during the Dark Ages, which lasted until about 1000 A.D., populations were tightly bound to the land surrounding the feudal lord's castle. People moved about only when there were festivals in other cities. These were the only occasions on which people could buy or look at different goods and have a chance to sell their own food or objects and fabrics made for sale. Fear controlled people�s lives and induced them to ask for protection from powerful warriors who had constructed well-defended castles, or from monasteries, which did not have soldiers but did have thick walls to hide behind. Life was hard, and , people thought little of clothing. Clothes were often made at home and were often rough and shapeless. Trousers, tunics and shawls were used to keep away the cold. The shawls were made of wool or fur and put over the shoulder. Most Europeans were dressed like today�s Benedictine monks, except for men�s trousers. Shoes were leather wrapped around the foot. Colors were plain; they were shades of gray, brown, dark blue and red. Conical hats were commonly worn.
This was a pyramidal society because the classes of people were in a shape of a pyramid.. with the kings and queens at the top of the pyramid (and were few in number) down to the peasants (who were many in number). In the middle were feudal lords, clerics, and others, such as vassals.

http://www.kyrene.org/schools/brisas/sunda/ma/1adele.htm

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sabato 15 marzo 2008

Chansons medievaux

Chansons medievaux
Recherches:
The following is an html version of my PhD dissertation, submitted as part of the requirements for the doctorate in systematic musicology from the Faculty of Music at the University of Western Ontario. Apart from minor corrections and changes in formatting it is unchanged and unrevised, so the research and bibliography are current only to 1994. The music examples were originally drawn by hand, and in order to make them available I scanned the printed sheets and converted them to gif images, which are viewable by clicking the appropriate links, either through the table of contents below, or from the main text.
The aim of this study is to lay the groundwork for an eventual codification of musical form and style in the troubadour songs. To that end, it concentrates on two of the broadest musical parameters, form and tonal structure. A new catalogue of all attributed songs is provided with the study, which is intended to remedy the deficiencies of Gennrich's, the only complete one available until now. It is based on descriptive and logical, rather than historical, principles, and the graphing procedure employed is designed to provide more information than the standard ones, by showing connections at the sub-phrase level. The songs are grouped into five large categories, based on the kind of phrase repetition found in their musical forms, and these categories then serve as a tool in the detailed examination of the nature and role of musical form in the repertoire. It is found that the troubadours' acknowledged fascination with structure for its own sake, as evidenced in their versification, can also be seen in their musical forms. Indeed, there is an intimate and dynamic interaction between the two kinds of form, which can serve as a paradigm for the understanding of music/text relations in the canso. The analysis of selected examples demonstrates some of the many ways in which the troubadours created subtle and finely articulated formal designs in their music; this contradicts the view that they were unskilled as composers and relied only on simple standard formulas for their music.v
http://www.troubadours.vaninpiano.com/bibliography.htm

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lunedì 10 marzo 2008

Alcoholic Drinks of the Middle Ages

Alcoholic Drinks of the Middle Ages
The intent of this writing is not to provide the reader with a recipe list, although recipes will be included in the text. What I hope to achieve is to provide a single, comprehensive source of documentation for all phases of the production of alcohol and its use in various drinks which can be used for competitions in the Arts and Sciences, or simply for personal knowledge. This type of information is often more difficult to find in our craft than it might be in many others and I hope that this will become a useful reference for all brewers and vinters.

To this end I have located what period sources that I could find (The Closet of Sir Kenelme Digbie Kt. Opened and Delightes for Ladies being excellent sources, as were others), as well as many others which are authoritative on the subject. The reader will find, herein, liberal doses of direct quotations from these writings, with the original sources credited, either directly in the text, or in associated footnotes. The footnotes will usually state only the author's name, the article or book referenced and the pages referenced. This will then refer to the complete bibliography. I have included a number of actual recipes throughout this writing, all of which are period recipes with the only exception being Mistrss Priscilka's recipe for Sake. Modifications can be made in these recipes as long as the materials used are correct for the type of drink which is being prepared the results should imitate the actual period beverage to within reasonable limits. Please note that modern tastes are generally quite different than those held in period and some modifications may be made simply so that oneself and one's friends will be willing to drink the finished product. Substitutions and modifications, however, have to be carefully chosen, so as not to change too much the overall character of the finished drink.

Procedures, however, are another matter entirely. I most heartily agree with Mistress Prisilka od Cervany Kamen (aka Priscilla Kucik), who recommends the use of period recipes along with modern preparation techniques1. These techniques include cleanliness to the point of sterility and the use of non-porous airtight containers. Another point on the recipes, in the case of actual period recipes which have come down as they were originally written, I will repeat them in the same manner so that techniques, style and materials can be learned.

http://mysite.verizon.net/mshapiro_42/calcohol.html

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mercoledì 27 febbraio 2008

A Guide to Medieval History Resources


A Guide to Medieval History Resources
This guide focuses on the print and electronic resources on medieval history in the University of Auckland Library system. These resources will help you locate material you need to supplement your course reading, and to write assignments, research essays, dissertations and theses.

The guide is organised primarily into reference tools and primary and secondary source material such as bibliographies, guides, catalogues and indexes. The function of each type of resource is explained briefly, followed by a selection of items with the location and call number.
These lists are selective.
Relevant Voyager searches are suggested to enable you to find additional resources of the same type.
http://www.library.auckland.ac.nz/subjects/hist/medievalresourcesguide.htm

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sabato 23 febbraio 2008

Medieval Information

Medieval Information
In Medieval-Castles.org, we are proud to have launched our new site, The Medieval Times which contains more up-to-date information about the Middle Ages. It contains information about the Crusades, medieval warfare, medieval life, the most important castles and much more. http://medieval-castles.org/index.php

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mercoledì 13 febbraio 2008

Medieval Christians and Muslims


Medieval Christians and Muslims
By: Gail Hinchion Mancini

A new chapter in the history of relations between Christians and Muslims is being revealed with the English translation of a 12th century manuscript by a Christian archbishop living in Baghdad.

The document, by the medieval Syrian bishop Dionysius Bar Salibi titled “A Response to Muslims,” has been translated from its original Syriac and Arabic and interpreted by Rev. Joseph Amar, professor of Classics at the University of Notre Dame.

Considered the longest and most comprehensive Syriac text to jointly examine the fundamental points of Muslim and Christian doctrine, it is unique among historic Syriac texts “for the amount of information it contains on the origins, history and doctrinal development of Islam,” says Father Amar.

The manuscript was written during a period when politics and religious relations in the Western world were defined by conflicts between the Byzantine empire and Arab invaders. A sample of that ongoing bitterness and its resonance today — was recalled recently when Pope Benedict XVI quoted statements by 14th century Emperor Manuel II Paleologus about violence and the Muslim religion.
www.nd.edu/~lumen/2007_02/MedievalChristiansandMuslims.shtml

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lunedì 11 febbraio 2008

Medieval Islamic Cultures

Medieval Islamic Cultures
http://www.sfusd.k12.ca.us/schwww/sch618/Islam_New_Main.html

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mercoledì 6 febbraio 2008

Jardins Medievaux

Jardins Medievaux
Créé en 1990, le Jardin Médiéval de Rodemack évoque «l’hortus conclusus » des châteaux forts. C’est un espace clos dont les zones cultivées forment des dessins géométriques. Chaque espace mis en culture est surélevé par rapport aux allées qui l’entourent. Il est délimité par un muret constitué de pavés. On y trouve quatre espèces :
- les plantes médicinales avec la bourrache, la pimprenelle, la camomille, la mélisse, la sauge,...
- les plantes condimentaires et aromatiques comme la patience des moines, l’estragon, la ciboule, la lavande, l’angélique, la sarriette, …
- les légumes et cultures vivrières ou utilitaires
- les fleurs avec les bleuets, les myosotis, les lupins, la reine marguerite… et la rose, fleur médiévale par excellence. Des arbres ou arbustes taillés sont plantés à certains endroits du jardin comme le cassissier, le néflier, le cerisier, …
www.avp-rodemack.com/monsite/jardin.html

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martedì 5 febbraio 2008

Moyen Age en lumière

Moyen Age en lumière
Partez à la découverte des images inédites du Moyen Âge!
En puisant parmi les 120 000 images des 25000 manuscrits numérisés dans les bibliothèques de France depuis 10 ans, une équipe de médiévistes renommés a composé pour vous 10 parcours thématiques pour découvrir autrement la vie des hommes au Moyen Âge. La sélection d'images présentée ici est renouvelée chaque jour.
Le Moyen Âge en lumière est le résultat d'une conjonction de partenaires et de moyens sans précédent : un éditeur multisupport (nouveau monde éditions) qui a conçu, outre ce site Web, un DVD-ROM grand public et un CD-ROM scolaire, un éditeur papier qui publie un beau livre illustré (Fayard), une équipe scientifique qui s'attache à photographier les miniatures(CNRS-IRHT), un mécène (Fondation des Banques CIC) et la Direction du Livre du Ministère de la Culture qui soutient ce programme depuis l'origine
www.moyenageenlumiere.com/index.cfm?fa=intro

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giovedì 31 gennaio 2008

medieval jewish

Medieval jewish center
Sources and history


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venerdì 25 gennaio 2008

Medieval Horse Guild

Medieval Horse Guild
The Medieval Horse Guild is a group of horsemen and horsewomen who occasionally cast off the trappings of modern life and cloak themselves in the pageantry of the Medieval Period. As a group they engage in a variety of activities ranging from the study of the techniques of horsemanship in the Middle Ages to participating in parades and battle recreations.In parades, the Horse Guild attempts to provide a colorful spectacle which will delight the parade onlookers. Members are encouraged to make their own medieval costumes and armor as well as tack for their mounts that is appropriate to the period being portrayed.The Horse Guild is affiliated with other, unmounted, medievalist groups, notably the Markland Medieval Mercenary Militia. Together, they participate in recreations of famous historical battles.Equestrian games are a popular activity of the Horse Guild. These are modern adaptations of the medieval equestrian games used to instill in the young knights the skills they would need to carry into battle. The modern versions of the games are carefully designed for the safety of both horse and rider but still serve the same purpose that they served for the knights; riding skill and confidence and a feeling of cooperation between man and horse that is essential for the enjoyment of horseback riding.
go to the site.
www.horseguild.com/

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mercoledì 23 gennaio 2008

medieval trees

Medieval trees
Medieval trees of virtues and vices depicted a spectrum of human qualities, from the basest earthliness (capital vices) to heavenly righteousness (cardinal virtues). They provided a structure in which monks could interpret and contemplate the associations between each abstraction. In the trees of Beinecke MS 416, chief virtues and vices are linked to subordinate traits, which make explicit the connections between various good and evil qualities. In this framework, monks learned to associate minor sins with greater vices and good qualities with principal virtues.
The seven clusters of fruit on the tree of virtues and tree of vices have a biblical origin: the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit found in Galatians 5.22. In our diagrams the fruits and branches of the tree of virtues point to toward Heaven, while the withering branches of the tree of vices droop toward Hell.
go to the site:
http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/speculum/3v-4r-virtues-and-vices.html

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martedì 15 gennaio 2008

Medieval Hawk

Medieval Hawk
The hawk has great courage in a small body; its determination arms it better than its claws do. It is called a robber bird because it greedily snatches food from other birds. The hawk is known as a harsh parent, refusing to feed its young when they are able to fly, but rather beating them with its wings to drive them out of the nest. This is done to teach them to catch prey while they are still young, so that they will not become lazy when they are adults. There are two kinds of hawks: wild hawks, which catch and eat domestic birds; and tame hawks, which return the wild birds they catch to their master. When its feathers become old, the hawk heats its wings in a warm wind to loosen the feathers and make them fall out; if there is no warm wind, the hawk beats its wings to heat them.
http://bestiary.ca/beasts/beast249.htm

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venerdì 11 gennaio 2008

Recreational Medievalism

Recreational Medievalism
Medieval cookery recipes:

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giovedì 10 gennaio 2008

Medieval Women

Medieval Women: sources
Dr. Vess's Medieval Monasticism Web site contains quite a bit of information on women in the medieval world. See especially the pages on Benedictine Monasticism, Anglo-Saxon Monasticism, Merovingian Monasticism, Medieval monastic women, and Irish monasticism for materials related to women in the Middle Ages.
The Beguines
Feminae Medieval Women and Gender Index great place to do a bibliographic search. indexes articles relating to several geographic regions.
Medieval women page from Georgetown Labyrinth. several dead links. no longer actively maintained.
Monastic Matrix set of resources for the study of medieval monastic women.
Interactive Exploration of Medieval and Renaissance Women
Several primary sources relating to women in medieval Europe from the Internet Women's History Sourcebook
Monographs, articles and other resources on medieval women from Questia.
Dominion and Domination of the Gentle Sex: The Lives of Medieval Women a thinkquest site.

go to the site:
www.faculty.de.gcsu.edu/~dvess/ids/women/medwom.html

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mercoledì 19 dicembre 2007

Medieval Christmas

Medieval Christmas: a tale
Our word Christmas is derived from the Middle English usage "Christ's Mass," and central to the celebration of the Nativity was the liturgical activity which had been established by the year 600, and did not change in the Middle Ages. In Medieval England there were, in fact, three Masses celebrated on Christmas Day. The first and most characteristic was at midnight (the Angel's Mass), catching up the notion that the light of salvation appeared at the darkest moment of the darkest date in the very depth of winter. The second Christmas Mass came at dawn (the Shepherd's Mass), and the third during the day (the Mass of the Divine Word). The season of Advent, the forty days of leading up to Christmas, was being observed in the Western Church by the year 500. St. Nicholas was a very popular Medieval saint, and his feast day came in Advent (6 December), but he did not play his part in Christmas as Santa Claus until after the Reformation.Also important in the celebration of Christmas was the banquet, which necessarily varied in sumptuosness with the resources of the celebrants. The menu varied with soups and stews, birds and fish, breads and puddings, but a common element was the Yule boar, an animal for those who could afford it or a pie shaped like a boar for more humble tables. Churches and houses were decorated with ivy, mistletoe, holly, or anything green, which remained up until the eve of Candlemass. The gift-giving of the season was represented by the New Year Gift, which continued a tradition of Roman origin. The later Christmas present was not part of a Medieval Christmas. The sorts of things that people might have done to entertain themselves at Christmas apart from eating is succintly summarized in a letter written by Margaret Paston on Christmas Eve 1459 after she had inquired how her Norfolk neighbour, Lady Morley, had conducted her household in mourning the previous Christmas, just after Lady Morley had been widowed:

"...there were no disguisings [acting], nor harping, luting or singing, nor any lewd sports, but just playing at the tables [backgammon] and chess and cards. Such sports she gave her folk leave to play and no other."
go to the site:
www.godecookery.com/mtales/mtales09.htm

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lunedì 17 dicembre 2007

Medieval Medecine

Medieval Medecine

The history of medicine, perhaps more than that of any other discipline or skilled occupation, illuminates broad social and cultural patterns of the period.To a medieval mind, the distinction between natural and supernatural was not always very clear. This shows in the perception of the causes of ailments, and the obscure treatments thought to help sick patients. The Catholic Church played a large role in development as well as management of medieval medicine. It contained it within bounds of one religion, disallowing most pagan healing practices.The underlying principle of medieval medicine were four humors - black bile, yellow bile, phlegm, and blood. The balance of these four allowed for the well-being of a person.Medicine in itself developed. Based on some Greek and Near Eastern principles and embellished with the discoveries of the Middle Ages, it set the foundation for contemporary medicine.Medieval medicine, for most part, was very forgiving about who practiced and who healed. Clergy and laymen, men and women, were allowed to practice medicine. The extent of this practice was not limited all throughout the Middle Ages. The final unification came with the Black Death, when the need for doctors to heal the sick was stronger than any prejudice against their origin.The education system has developed in order to teach law and medicine to the willing. Guilds were created to allow crafts to prosper. The middle class of the society was in the making.

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lunedì 26 novembre 2007

Medieval Houses

Medieval Houses of God, or Ancient Fortresses?

Investigations in Lalibela, Ethiopia, are revealing that Africa's most important historical Christian site is much older than previously thought. Up until now, scholars have regarded the spectacular complex of 11 rock-cut churches as dating from around A.D. 1200, but new survey work carried out by a British archaeologist suggests that three of the churches may have originally been "built" half a millennium earlier as fortifications or other structures in the waning days of the Axumite Empire.

"The discovery will completely change the way historians perceive the origins of Africa's most famous indigenous Christian site," says David Phillipson, professor of African archaeology at Cambridge University. His research, to be fully published next year, suggests that two of the churches, those of Merkurios (a local Ethiopian saint) and the archangel Gabriel, were initially carved out of the rock as some sort of elite palace or fortress complex. A third structure created in that same early period later became the church of Danagel (the Virgin Martyrs). The Merkurios and Gabriel structures were built in highly defensible positions and may well have been the core of a fortified complex created during the politically unstable period that saw the disintegration of the Axumite Empire in the mid-seventh century A.D. At its peak in the third to sixth centuries A.D., that empire controlled much of northern Ethiopia and Eritrea, and at times Yemen and even part of the Nile Valley.go to the site:
www.archaeology.org/0411/newsbriefs/ethiopia.html


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sabato 24 novembre 2007

Medievaraldic Pendants

Medieval Heraldic Pendants
Click on the thumbnails for a much larger image! Below are both hanging pendants ,leather stud type, and rivetted types. As requested I have left a link on the bottom of the page to the previously sold pendants.
go to the site:
www.theinterestingshop.com/pages/heraldicpendants.html

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sabato 10 novembre 2007

Medieval Tales

Medieval Tales
True stories, fables, and anecdotes from the Middle Age.
Angels:
Visions of angels, of dead saints, of departing souls, and of the Other World were numerous in the Middle Ages. Angels mande revelations to saints, talked with them, aided them in danger; they were seen by them in conflict with demons. People saw one or many angels standing by holy men at their devotions. The Venerable Bede says of St. Cuthbert that he was often allowed to see and converse with angels, and when hungry was refreshed by food prepared by the Lord. St. Columbia was said to have received many "sweet angel visits," when sleepless or in solitude. go to the site:
Detail of wall painting in the church of S. Angelo in Formis,late 11th or early 12th century

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sabato 3 novembre 2007

Medieval Plants

Medieval Plants
Civilizations as early as the Chaldean in southwestern Asia were among the first to have a belief in plants that never existed, and the practice continued well beyond the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Originally, this was done to disperse the mystery surrounding certain seemingly-miraculous events and to symbolically embody in a physical form various aspects - wealth, happiness, fertility, illness, etc. Later, people began to invent "nonsense plants" to enliven the tale of an otherwise boring voyage, and with the invention of the printed book, to entertain readers who loved to believe in such fables. Even spices, which were an important element of Medieval food, commerce, trade, & society, were given exotic & incredible backgrounds. The fabulous trees and fauna discussed here are just a small example of the many fantastic plants our medieval forebears believed in. As will be evident, trees, because of their longevity and immensity, have been foremost among the plants considered sacred, mystic, or mythical.
Mythical Plants of the Middle Ages is based on the writings of Ernst & Johanna Lehner and William A. Emboden.

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giovedì 1 novembre 2007

Medieval Colours

Medieval colours
Series of cards with a design based on Medieval themes and on natural dyes common in Medieval times. The design panels all use textiles dyed with natural dyes on a base of handmade paper that often incorporates plant and vegetable artefacts.
Each 6" by 4" folded card (15cm by 10cm) is made from 100% recycled materials and bears a unique design on the centre of the front cover. The designs comprise a handmade paper background with a foreground of silk dyed with natural dyes and natural artefacts. All the cards are unique and the design may vary from the photograph. go to the site:
http://wildpaper.weebly.com/medieval.html

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venerdì 26 ottobre 2007

Medieval Pilgrimage

Medieval Pilgrimage
His then was the situation encountered by Christianity when it began arriving in (what is often called) ‘pagan’ Europe during the 2nd through 8th centuries. Upwards of 3000 years had passed since megalithic times yet the influences of that era were still felt. Larger social centers had developed around many of the ancient megalithic settlement sites and the archaic stone rings, dolmens and earthen mounds continued to play a significant role in the religious life of the different pagan communities. While the pagan’s understandings of earth energies were perhaps diluted by thousands of years of cultural infusions, their mythologies and religious traditions were very often still associated with the megalithic sacred sites, and particular periods in different solar, lunar and astrological cycles (discovered during the megalithic era) were celebrated with festivities, maypole dancing and fertility goddess holy days.This continuing and powerful attraction which pagan people felt for their sacred places deeply disturbed the Christian authorities. This is evidenced by an edict of Aries in 452 AD:If any infidel either lighted torches, or worshipped trees, fountains, or stones, or neglected to destroy them, he should be found guilty of sacrilege. In the early centuries of the Christian era there was a wholesale destruction of pagan shrines at the sacred places. However, as the Christian church slowly recognized they could not catholicize the pre-existing cultures merely through the use of brute force, they developed the method of securing religious control of the people by placing churches and monastery foundations upon the pagan's sacred sites.
go to the site:

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venerdì 28 settembre 2007

Strumenti musicali del Medioevo

Strumenti musicali del Medioevo
Quasi tutti gli strumenti musicali dell'Europa medioevale vennero dall'Asia: o dal Sud-est per il tramite di Bisanzio, o dall'Impero islamico attraverso il Nord Africa, o dal Nord-est attraverso la costa baltica. L'eredità diretta dalla Grecia e da Roma sembra essere stata piuttosto insignificante, e la Lira è il solo strumento che potrebbe essere considerato di probabile origine europea. Quindi l'Europa accoglie numerosissimi strumenti dalle altre culture limitrofe e lentamente ma inesorabilmente li modifica secondo i propri usi e costumi fino a farli diventare i capostipiti degli strumenti musicali che tuttora sono usati nell'esecuzione della musica del nostro tempo, sia classica che di altro tipo. Per quanto riguarda il Medioevo e soprattutto il periodo intorno all'anno mille, va subito detto che gli strumenti musicali raramente entrano a far parte delle esecuzioni di musica religiosa, come il canto gregoriano. Il canto cristiano fu infatti in origine un semplice ampliamento della preghiera di lode a Dio secondo la tradizione ebraica ed è spiegabile che esso respingesse ogni apporto strumentale. visita i siti:
www.harmoniae.com/strumenti_intro.cfm
ontanomagico.altervista.org/strumenti.htm
http://www.sangineto.info/

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martedì 25 settembre 2007

Knights and Armor

Knights and Armor

Like most periods in history, the era of knights evolved gradually. The term "knight" originates from the Anglo-Saxon name for a boy: "cniht". Indeed, most early knights were not much more than hired "boys" who performed military service and took oaths of loyalty to any well-to-do nobleman or warlord offering the most promise of money or war booty.
In the chaos and danger of post-Roman Western Europe, the population had very little organized governmental protection from brigands and conquering warbands. Knowing there was safety in numbers, local lords (who could afford it) gathered around them young, fighting-age men to fend off rebellious vassals or conquering neighbors. These men, in turn, were rewarded with war booty for their service and loyalty. Soon, grants of land were made so the young soldiers could receive an income from those lands and afford the high cost of outfitting themselves with the accoutrements of war, such as horses, armor, and weapons. The era of the medieval knight had begun.
It wasn't long before some knights began to treat their land grants as hereditary rights (usually transferring ownership to the eldest son upon death), thus beginning the rise of knights as a "landed" class whose importance went beyond simply being a military "free-agent". Knights soon found themselves involved in local politics, the dispensation of justice, and numerous other required tasks for their sovereign, or liege lord.
go to the site: www.knightsandarmor.com/history.htm

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venerdì 7 settembre 2007

Medieval sights

Medieval sights and sounds
go to the site: www.evergreen.loyola.edu/~fbauerschmidt/HN240_00_images.html




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venerdì 31 agosto 2007

Marriage during the Middle Ages

Marriage during the Middle Ages
Weddings during medieval times saw the origin of several modern traditions and customs. There was more to the Middle Ages than just castles, chivalry, and fancy colours. It was a time of developement for many social and marriage customs followed by brides today. This era between the fall of the Roman Empire and the Reformation was unique and through it all, faith was the ever-present catalyst for artistic, intellectual, social, and political developments. Medieval marriage was still the province of the Church, and the sacrament of matrimony was central to Christian doctrine. Grooms, on the average, were much older than their brides. Noble women sometimes didn't marry until the age of 24, but this was rare. More than 3/4 were married before they reached 19. By today's standards, western Europe was inhabited by the young, with more than half of the population under 20 years of age. http://www.medieval-weddings.net/

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martedì 28 agosto 2007

Medieval Cakes

Medieval Cakes
The center part (minus the turnable page) for my 65th birthday cake. Borders copy one from a medieval page along with my arms and the SCA symbol for the Order of the Rose. The arms and rose are on rice paper and painted with paste food colors. Left hand text is a "bastard" mixture of Latin, English and Spanish. Right hand page is a copy of text from a 16th century book of manners. Writing is done with a number 1 tip.
go to the site: home.netcom.com/~alysk/photos-medievalcakes.html

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giovedì 23 agosto 2007

Medieval clocks

Medieval clocks
The Egyptians were big on sundials. The Chinese favored water clocks. In the early Middle Ages, time was first marked down the length of a candle in hourly increments. Next came large hour glasses, which were only good for an hour...or two.
Then, Brother Gerbert, who later became Pope Sylvester II, invented a simple mechanism in 966 that rang bells at regular intervals throughout the day to call his brethren to prayer. It was the beginning of mechanical clocks as we know them today.
Soon, cathedral towers were providing the rest of the faithful with their first glimpse of a right proper (although not always accurate) mechanical clock.
The earliest of these is credited to Jacopo de Dondi, who designed an astronomical clock for the cathedral tower in Padua in 1344. Curiously, almost every zodiac sign surrounds the clock face except for the balanced scales of Libra. (As the story goes, it was deliberately left out of the lineup by guild workers who felt they weren't treated fairly in salary negotiations.)
Strasbourg Cathedral's mechancial clock appeared in 1354, and was followed by the third, and most elaborate mechanical clock, built in Prague's Town Hall in 1410.
This being the Middle Ages, the Prague clock depicted earth at the center of the universe - with the sun, moon, and stars revolving around it. Blue and red halves separated day and night. With embellishments added over the centuries, today the clock remains a veritable funhouse of timekeeping.


go to the site:

http//.www.newyorkcarver.com/invetion4.htm

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giovedì 19 luglio 2007

Medieval Drinks

Medieval Drinks
Among the Medieval Drinks, beer was much in vogue. Charlemagne ordered that skilled brewers to be attached to his farms. Everywhere, the monastic houses had their own breweries, a tradition which is continuing even in our times (the Belgian Abbey Biers, like Leffe or Affligem are good examples). However, during the reign of St. Louis, there were only few breweries in Paris itself, and despite their privileges, the brewers had to leave the capital, as there was no demand for their product. They reappeared in 1428, and, either as a caprice of fashion or because wine was more expensive, the consumption of beer became again general across France. The flavored beers became much in fashion. The beer was sweetened with honey or scented with raspberries.
n the 13th Century, hydromel, composed of one part of honey and twelve parts of water, was especially appreciated by the monks, who feasted on it on the great anniversaries of the Church. Cider was also popular, and in the 13th Century, the inhabitants of the Auge and Normandy made cider their daily drink. Our forefathers, who loved dainty dishes, were also connoisseurs in wine. The cultivation of the vine became general, and kings themselves planted them, even in the gardens of their palaces. The wine became the most appreciated of all Medieval Drinks, and the wine trade had acquired an enormous importance, especially in France.
The trade of a wine-merchant is one of the oldest established in Paris, but this does not mean that the sale of wine was exclusively carried on by special tradesmen. For a long time, the owner of the vineyard retailed the wine which he had not been able to sell in the cask. A broom, a laurel wreath, or some other sign hung over a door, denoted that any one passing by could purchase or drink wine within. Sometimes, the wine-growers placed a man before the door of their cellar, who enticed the public to enter and taste the new wines. Others established a tavern in a room of their house, where they retail the drink. The monks also opened this kind of taverns in the monasteries, as they only consumed part of their wine themselves. The custom was adopted even by the nobles, who had the advantage that, whilst they were retailing their wines, no one in the district was allowed to enter into the competition with them.

The wines of France in most request from the 9th to the 13th Century were those of Cahors, Rheims, Choisy, Marne, Meulan, Orleanais. In the 13th Century, wines like the Beaune, in Burgundy, the Saint-Emilion in Guyenne, Chablis, Epernay, in Champagne, were much appreciated. In the 14th Century, a man of fashion would drink nothing but Saint-Pourçain.
go to the site:
www.medieval-spell.com/Medieval-Drinks.html


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mercoledì 27 giugno 2007

Famous men of Middle Age

Genseric the Vandal
he Vandals were another wild and fierce tribe that came from the shores of the Baltic and invaded central and southern Europe in the later times of the Roman Empire.
In the fifth century some of these people occupied a region in the south of Spain. One of their most celebrated kings was name Genseric (Gen’-ser-ic). He became king in 427, when he was but twenty-one years of age. He was lame in one leg and looked as if he were a very ordinary person.
Like most of the Vandals, he was a cruel and cunning man, but he had great ability in many ways. He fought in battles even when a boy and was known far and wide for his bravery and skill as a leader.
About the time that Genseric became king, the governor of the Roman province in the north of Africa, on the Mediterranean coast, was a man called Count Boniface. This Count Boniface had been a good and loyal officer of Rome; but a plot was formed against him by Aëtius, the general who had fought Attila at Châlons. The Roman emperor at the time of the plot was Valentinian III. He was then too young to act as ruler, so the affairs of government were managed by his mother Placidia (Pla-cid’-i-a).
Aëtius advised Placidia to dismiss Boniface and call him home from Africa. He said the count was a traitor, and that he was going to make war against Rome. At the same time he wrote secretly to Count Boniface and told him that if he came to Rome the empress would put him to death.
Boniface believed this story, and he refused to return to Rome. He also sent a letter to Genseric, inviting him to come to Africa with an army. Genseric was greatly delighted to receive the invitation from Boniface. He had long wanted to attack Rome and take from her some of the rich countries she had conquered, and now a good opportunity offered. So he got ready a great army of his brave Vandals, and they sailed across the Strait of Gibraltar to Africa.

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lunedì 4 giugno 2007

Medicina Medievale

Medicina Medievale
Il Medioevo raccoglie l'eredità della medicina del mondo classico: nonostante che nell'Alto Medioevo si assista ad una apparente stasi degli studi di medicina, ciò non significa che la medicina non sia stata praticata. Sino dal VI secolo si hanno notizie di centri medici in Italia e in altre parti d'Europa, mentre nei monasteri la medicina si arricchisce di nuove esperienze. Ma sarà a partire dal XII secolo che la medicina in Occidente vivrà una nuova stagione con la definizione di un nuovo status del medico e con l'ingresso della medicina nell'insegnamento universitario. Con il rinnovato vigore degli studi anatomici a partire dal XIV secolo e con le nuove traduzioni delle opere mediche dell'Antichità, la medicina corre verso il Rinascimento e verso l'età moderna.
Nell'Alto Medioevo si assiste ad un fenomeno di semplificazione del bagaglio culturale medico dell'antichità: mentre la tradizione teorica medica greco-romana e alessandrina rimase come patrimonio della cultura bizantina, nell’Occidente cristiano questa venne dimenticata, residuandone solo una piccola parte che venne conservata nelle biblioteche dei monasteri od ancora insegnata, seppure in pochi centri, in Francia o nelle aree di tradizione bizantina, come Ravenna. Come se il lato più pagano della medicina, quello teoretico cioè, fosse stato in qualche modo isolato e ridotto al minimo indispensabile, dando invece preferenza alle raccolte di ricette, quindi alla terapia. I testi medici che circolavano tra V e X secolo nei grandi monasteri e nelle rare scuole erano infatti compilazioni di materiali tra i più disparati, spesso finalizzate all'insegnamento: brevi opere teorico-pratiche, raccolte di farmacopee o, più spesso, manuali di tipo pratico dove le varie malattie venivano descritte in maniera sommaria con l'indicazione della relativa. Comunque sia, tra questo materiale è possibile ritrovare alcuni testi ippocratici, qualche più raro testo galenico, rimaneggiamenti di opere di Mustio, Aureliano Celio, Sereno Psammonico e di autori più tardi come Paolo di Egina od Oribasio.
vai al sito:
www.accademiajr.it/medweb/introduzione.html

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martedì 29 maggio 2007

Medieval Pilgrims' Clothing

Medieval Pilgrims' Clothing
Following are depictions of medieval men and women on pilgrimage. Trends to note: colors (brown or black), cloaks, broad hats, satchels (or "wallets"), staffs, and badges (especially the scallop-shell of Santiago de Compostela). There are also several manuscripts of Le pèlerinage de la vie humaine, in which the hero is depicted as a literal pilgrim; a few image-collections from some of the manuscripts of this texts are linked below:
a guide in the internet information to the site:
www.larsdatter.com/pilgrims.htm

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domenica 27 maggio 2007

Music, Body, and Desire in Medieval Culture

Music, Body, and Desire in Medieval Culture
by Bruce W. Holsinger
Ranging chronologically from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries and thematically from Latin to vernacular literary modes, this book challenges standard assumptions about the musical cultures and philosophies of the European Middle Ages. Engaging a wide range of premodern texts and contexts, from the musicality of sodomy in twelfth-century polyphony to Chaucer’s representation of pedagogical violence in the Prioress’s Tale, from early Christian writings on the music of the body to the plainchant and poetry of Hildegard of Bingen, the author argues that medieval music was quintessentially a practice of the flesh.
go to the site:
www.sup.org/book.cgi?book_id=3201%204058%20

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mercoledì 25 aprile 2007

Ibn Battuta: a great traveller

Ibn Battuta: a great traveller
To the world of today the men of medieval Christendom already seem remote and unfamiliar. Their names and deeds are recorded in our history-books, their monuments still adorn our cities, but our kinship with them is a thing unreal, which costs an effort of imagination. How much more must this apply to the great Islamic civilization, that stood over against medieval Europe, menacing its existence and yet linked to it by a hundred ties that even war and fear could not sever. Its monuments too abide, for those who may have the fortunate to visit them, but its men and manners are to most of us utterly unknown, or dimly conceived in the romantic image of the Arabian Nights. Even for the specialist it is difficult to reconstruct their lives and see them as they were. Histories and biographies there are in quantity, but the historians for all their picturesque details, seldom show the ability to select the essential and to give their figures that touch of the intimate which makes them live again for the reader. It is in this faculty that Ibn Battuta excels."Thus begins the book, "Ibn Battuta, Travels in Asia andAfrica 1325-1354" published by Routledge and Kegan Paul
go to the site:
www.ummah.net/history/scholars/ibn_battuta/

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lunedì 23 aprile 2007

Viaggiatori arabi

Il viaggio di Ibn Gubayr
Ibn Gubayr Abiì al-Husayn ibn Ahmad al-Kinani. Poeta andaluso, nasce a Valenza nel 1145. Sbarca in Sicilia nel 1184, al ritorno di un viaggio in Terrasanta. Scrisse un diario dei suoi viaggi, Viaggio dei Kinilnz, di cui riportiamo alcune brani relativi al suo soggiorno in Sicilia, nella traduzione di M. Amari.
Per alcuni stralci del testo vai al sito:
http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/gubayr.htm

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sabato 14 aprile 2007

Medieval Travels

Travel Literature
Travel literature is a popular genre of published work today. However, it is rarely a dispassionate and scientific recording of conditions in other lands. As a literary genre, it has certain conventions. Readers are generally seeking the exotic, the other, the different in the places they explore in literary mode. We want to learn about the headhunters of Borneo, not the oil rig workers; the wildebeest and gazelles of Africa, not the various species of rats; the temples of Greece, not the takeaway hamburger restaurants. We would rather see the inhabitants of a Swiss mountain village dressed in anachronistic clothes that they wear for an annual culture festival than in their jeans and T-shirts. We may also be seeking our own origins and trying to tie our culture and customs to a sense of place. Australians and Americans lap up literary tours of the historic monuments of England and Europe. We mostly are not terribly interested in their football teams or descriptions of the London Stock Exchange. We demand disjunctions of time, place and continuity, not accuracy.
go to the site:
medievalwriting.50megs.com/word/travel.htm

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sabato 7 aprile 2007

Ballads in Medieval Europe



Ballads in Medieval Europe
In twelfth century Europe, there was no television, no radio or recorded music, no computers or telephones, no newspapers or magazines.Books are rare, hand-written documents and they were in Latin, a language only a few, very educated people could read. Professional musicians lived in the households of very wealthy noblemen, or traveled from place to place, as did wandering actors who presented plays based on stories from the Bible, but professional entertainment was a rare luxury for most people. In such a world, it was important to be able to make your own entertainment. People told stories, played riddling games and played chess a few other more simple games that have survived until today. To find out about some games of the Middle Ages and how to play them, visit Tara Hill Design's Rules for Medieval Games page . The games at the bottom of that page, Nine Man's Morris or Merreles, Fox and Geese and Sailor's Solitaire, were all played in 12th century Britain. A stone board for playing Merreles was recovered when Jedburgh Abbey was excavated by archaeologists in 1984. Jedburgh is very close to the places where An Earthly Knight is set.
go to the site:
www.janetmcnaughton.ca/ekballads.html

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venerdì 9 marzo 2007

The Formation of the Medieval West

The Formation of the Medieval West
Studies in the Oral Culture of the Barbarians
Micheal Richter
This book is the first extensive study of the oral culture in the early medieval West. Access to this culture is inevitably through the written sources, and indeed there is quite substantial information in the sources once these are properly 'decoded'. Latin is the dominant language of the surviving contemporary records, but it emerges that this language is highly inadequate to articulate the main features of the early medieval non-Latin societies. It is argued that the written sources in the period are not representative for these societies generally, which in fact had a broad based, effective and adequate oral culture. It is suggested that this situation accounts for the slow emergence of vernacular literature.
The book also poses approaches to the field of music, also an integral part of the oral culture, and while the text remains strongly problem-orientated, suggesting ways of dealing concretely with oral culture in times of distant past, it will become a standard reference for academics and students in this field.
http://www.four-courts-press.ie/cgi/bookshow.cgi?file=formmw.xml

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sabato 3 marzo 2007

Gothic Eye

Gothic Eye
Gothic Eye is a commercial picture library specialising in medieval images including effigies, tombs, brasses and manuscripts, sourced from original photographs and antiquarian engravings. Gothic Eye also offers an image research and proofing service.All images on this website are displayed at low resolution. Purchased images are supplied at high resolution on CD. To sample the quality of our supplied images click on the link below:
http://www.gothiceye.com/

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giovedì 1 marzo 2007

Medieval Lyric

The Medieval Lyric
The Medieval Lyric, a set of Anthologies and compact discs, and Teaching Medieval Lyric with Modern Technology, a CD-ROM application, offer to interested colleagues a variety of materials for the teaching of medieval song. These materials include recordings of the songs, modern musical and textual transcriptions and facing English translations, selected readings for pronunciation, and related manuscript images. Brief commentaries and longer essays by noted scholars show how the materials can be adapted to different types of courses.The repertories stretch from the 11th to the 14th centuries and include monastic songs from Saint Martial of Limoges; troubadour and trouvère songs; songs and miracles by Gautier de Coinci (in Teaching Medieval Lyric with Modern Technology only); Guillaume de Machaut, Remede de Fortune; songs from Germany and England (in The Medieval Lyric only); and selected Cantigas of Alfonso X, the Learned (in Teaching Medieval Lyric with Modern Technology only).
go to the site:
http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/medst/medieval_lyric/index.html


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mercoledì 28 febbraio 2007

Medieval Art on web

Medieval Art on web
Art Images for College Teaching (AICT) is a personal, non-profit project of its author, art historian and visual resources curator Allan T. Kohl . AICT is intended primarily to disseminate images of art and architectural works in the public domain on a free-access,
free-use basis to all levels of the educational community, as well as to the public at large. The images displayed on this site have been photographed on location by the author, who consents to their use in any application that is both educational and non-commercial in nature.
go to the site:
http://arthist.cla.umn.edu/aict/html/medieval.html

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giovedì 1 febbraio 2007

Resources for Medieval Studies

Resources for Medieval Studies
Resources for Medieval Studies The Labyrinth: La Georgetown University sponsorizza un sistema di ricerca telematica sulle fonti del Medioevo suddivise per tematiche.
go to the site:
http://labyrinth.georgetown.edu/

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